Sessions

Sessions 2018-01-30T15:45:00+00:00

Chutes and Ladders: Communication Strategies to Help Children Regulate Emotion

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

Nearly everyone is familiar with the iconic children’s board game called “Chutes and Ladders.” Using this metaphor, the presenter will discuss communication strategies in which adults can co-regulate a child’s emotional reactions and affective responses while simultaneously facilitating reflective dialogue to promote higher order social and emotional learning. Participants will be introduced to a more comprehensive developmental model of adult-child interaction, called Guided Relational Opportunities for Wholeness, in which children can learn to manage stress and become increasingly self-regulated in the context of healthy emotional connections with self-regulated adults. Specific challenges for children with trauma, attachment insecurity and other special needs will be explored. Participants will learn about the role of shame in creating barriers to social learning and potential detours towards dysfunction.

Presented by Caren Rosser-Morris, consulting and clinical child psychologist, Pennsylvania Department of Human Services, Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Harrisburg, Pa.

Healthy Relationships: Our Schools’ Social and Emotional Core

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

This session focuses on the essential “R” in CASEL’s SEL competencies – relationship building skills. Our human connections are at the heart of the educational environment and they lay the foundation for a students’ sense of belonging, academic performance and their social and emotional identity. Participants will have the opportunity to assess quality of relationships in their schools – adult-to-adult, adult-to-student, student-to-student and student-to adult. Attendees will build and practice skills associated with relationship building and will explore the concept of emotion coaching to provide strategic support for the emotional needs of students. This session will also allow time for collaborative problem solving of relational challenges in our schools, which not only benefits students but contributes to staff retention as well.

Presented by Judy Nuss, SEL specialist consultant, Collaborative for Academic (CASEL), Social and Emotional Learning, Palmyra, Pa.

Integration of Mindsets, Essential Skills, and Habits into K-12 Practice and Policy

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

This session, applicable to a variety of grade levels, teaching styles, and SEL competencies, focuses on how to integrate SEL into existing classroom practices using data and the expertise of teachers and administrators. This process encourages educators to closely examine their everyday practices (e.g., lesson planning, teacher evaluations, scheduling) through a new lens in which SEL is emphasized. A variety of research-based strategies exist to apply to the classroom and to school or district-wide policies. However, this session will go beyond the use of such policies, and will provide training to facilitate a more subtle, intricate integration into every day interactions and practices. Additionally, the use of “learning cycles” will be explored, whereby practitioners examine data to monitor whether their changes in practice are resulting in the outcomes they seek.

Presented by Richard Fournier, director of district partnerships, Transforming Education, Boston, Mass.; and Stephanie Hurley, manager of district partnerships, Transforming Education, Boston, Mass.

Learning Resilience and Relationship Strategies Using Applied Positive Psychology

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

Mental toughness keeps you going when you most want to quit. It is the key to success in long-term, massively challenging endeavors or ever-changing organizations. Until recently, people thought you either had “it” or you didn’t. But a growing body of breaking research reveals that mental toughness or “resilience” is not only a mindset that separates those who succeed from those who plateau – it is a teachable and buildable set of skills. Participants will receive an overview of the field of positive psychology and the skills to support personal mastery in the areas of growth mindset, resilience, optimism, willpower and self-care. This session will be fun, upbeat and will infuse innovative learning experiences and game design techniques to maximize engagement and motivation.

Presented by Louis Alloro, senior fellow, Center for the Advancement of Wellbeing, Philadelphia, Pa.

Mindful Practices and Social Emotional Learning – Together

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

Mindful practices of attention, awareness and movement fortify our human capacity for self-care, self-regulation and resilience. Mindfulness encourages a sense of openness and authenticity, often required to take on social emotional content and activities. Wellness Works in Schools has brought site-based mindfulness and SEL into classrooms for more than 16 years. Through professional development, comprehensive curriculums and digital tools, Wellness Works is supporting educators across the planet – to integrate mindful, social emotional learning into their own lives and into the lives of their students. Participants will leave this session with a set of practices and test-driven strategies along with other valuable resources.

Presented by Wynne Kinder, owner and trainer, Kinder Associates, LLC, Wrightsville, Pa.; and Kim Stoltzfus, instructor, Kinder Associates, LLC, Wrightsville, Pa.

Promoting Effective SEL in Your Community

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

Join social-emotional learning proponents from across the region and discover approaches for developing an effective SEL plan for your school, organization, district, or community. Whether you have been implementing SEL for some time or are just getting started, there are concrete steps that you can take to improve your effectiveness and results. In this interactive session, based on successful “Promoting Effective SEL in Your Community” events that the Social-Emotional Learning Alliance for Massachusetts (www.sel4ma.org) conducts across Massachusetts, learn best practices and practical solutions for developing and implementing a comprehensive SEL plan. Explore effective strategies for developing your vision for comprehensive SEL, assessing the current state of SEL in your community, engaging key stakeholders, and planning effective action.

Presented by Jim Vetter, executive director, Social Emotional Learning Alliance for Massachusetts, Somerville, Mass.

Promoting Positive Behavior: A Toolbox for Meeting Student Needs and Teaching Social and Emotional Skills

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

This session introduces an evidence-informed model that promotes a set of attitudes and behaviors among educators that have been theoretically and empirically linked to positive changes in student behavior and classroom climate, and ultimately, to increased learning. Participants will have an opportunity to identify specific structures, rituals, routines and practices for engaging young people in social emotional learning and creating environments that support success. Participants will learn to view youth behaviors that adults find challenging through the lens of unmet needs and lagging skills, allowing them to implement strategies to more effectively meet needs and teach skills. Participants will leave with an organized “toolbox” of strategies and a common language for preventing, understanding, and responding to challenging behaviors. They will also learn to promote positive behaviors, through role modeling, building relationships, clarifying expectations, establishing structures and routines, adapting for individual needs and responding, reflecting and repairing in times of conflict.

Presented by Stacey Alicea, senior director, Ramapo for Children, New York, N.Y.

4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Bridgeport Room

Taught by an experienced yoga teacher with a long history of working with teachers, administrators, children and people of all body types and abilities, this class will include some basic standing poses, sitting poses (on the floor or chair), reclining poses, breathing exercises and general breath-focus for mood management and relaxation. Join us to refresh, restore and for a chance to practice self-care. This class will also inspire and support you to model calmness and well-being in your classroom. No experience or flexibility necessary. Feel free to change into comfortable clothes or come in conference attire.

Mats and chairs provided.

Special instruction times 9:45 AM – 10:15 AM; 11:45 AM – 12:45 PM; and 2:15 PM – 2:45 PM
Bridgeport Room

Come and visit the “mindfulness room” any time throughout the day. Relax in the pleasant ambiance created for your comfort. Take a few minutes to soak in the atmosphere, breathe and enjoy the serenity. No formal instruction will be provided until each break. However, you will have the option to visit several “stations” set up with tools that you can try out and practice for yourself.

During breaks and lunch, meet Joanne Spence, executive director of Yoga in Schools. Joanne will lead mini yoga-inspired mindfulness breaks. Learn short but practical techniques that can be replicated in the classroom to encourage calmness, relaxation and self-reflection. Leave these mini-sessions refreshed and ready for your next workshop.

Please refrain from using cell phones or holding conversations in the room in order to honor the experience of our other guests.

Ask the Expert

During this informal session, attendees will have the unique opportunity to talk to internationally-renowned SEL expert, Dr. Maurice Elias. Attendees who select this session can ask specific project-based or school-based questions, get Dr. Elias’s recommendations on a particular challenge, or learn about implementation strategies and best practices. Attendees may also learn from questions posed by others and the broader group discussion. Consultation can be a costly venture so be sure to take advantage of this opportunity while space remains. Only 20 seats available.

Dr. Maurice J. Elias is a professor, Psychology Department, Rutgers University, director of the Rutgers Social-Emotional and Character Development Lab, and academic director of the Collaborative Center for Community-Based Research and Service at Rutgers University.

Building Assets, Reducing Risks: Strategies to Help Students Become More Successful in School and Life

Appropriate for: Middle and High School

Building Assets, Reducing Risks (BARR) is a comprehensive, strengths-based social and emotional learning model proven to decrease educational disparities while increasing achievement for all students. The model combines teachers’ real-time analysis of student data with student asset building and intensive teacher-to-teacher and teacher-to-student collaboration to prevent course failure, as well as to accelerate middle and high performers. With more than 19 years of proven results, schools across the United States are implementing this school reform model to improve academic achievement and graduation rates and to reduce risky adolescent behavior. In 2016, the U.S. Department of Education awarded a $20 million grant for the scale-up of the BARR model in schools across the country. BARR researchers are seeking over 66 more schools to participate over the next five years. Come find out if your school might be a good fit for this model.

Presented by Robert Metz, deputy director, Building Assets, Reducing Risks, Lakeville, Minn.

Can We Take Care of Students If We Don’t Take Care of Ourselves?

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

The profession of teaching offers many rewards, not the least of which is the opportunity to touch the minds and hearts of students for their entire lifetime. However, we are all aware that the current demands of teaching can be very stressful, leading many to disillusionment, burnout and even a premature exit from the profession – sometimes within the first few years of beginning their career. There are situations in education over which we have little, if any, control, but psychologists have increasingly focused on what some have labeled “therapeutic lifestyle changes.” These are changes in our behaviors that, while difficult to implement, are within our control to do so and are associated with mindset changes. In this workshop, we will examine the changes we can make to lessen stress and possible burnout, to enhance our impact as educators, and to become more resilient in different areas of our lives.

Presented by Robert Brooks, clinical psychologist and faculty, Harvard Medical School, Needham, Mass.

Chutes and Ladders: Communication Strategies to Help Children Regulate Emotion

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

Nearly everyone is familiar with the iconic children’s board game called “Chutes and Ladders.” Using this metaphor, the presenter will discuss communication strategies in which adults can co-regulate a child’s emotional reactions and affective responses while simultaneously facilitating reflective dialogue to promote higher order social and emotional learning. Participants will be introduced to a more comprehensive developmental model of adult-child interaction, called Guided Relational Opportunities for Wholeness, in which children can learn to manage stress and become increasingly self-regulated in the context of healthy emotional connections with self-regulated adults. Specific challenges for children with trauma, attachment insecurity and other special needs will be explored. Participants will learn about the role of shame in creating barriers to social learning and potential detours towards dysfunction. This workshop is an abbreviated version of the Explore More session offered by the same name on Wednesday, May 9, 2018.

Presented by Caren Rosser-Morris, consulting and clinical child psychologist, Pennsylvania Department of Human Services, Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Harrisburg, Pa.

Culturally Responsive Approaches to School Culture and Climate

Appropriate for: Elementary, Middle and High School

In order to create a positive culture and climate we must explore safety, relationships, teaching and learning, and educational environments. This session is designed to facilitate reflective conversation about how understanding self-identity, relationship building, intentional school culture creation, and on-going data review can cultivate positive and sustainable school climate. The session is intended to equip participants with tools and strategies that support sustained school climate improvement efforts and improve the overall educational framework for student success.

Presented by Kori Hamilton Biagas, education consultant, Until the Wheels Fall Off, LLC, Cheverly, Md.

Improve Classroom Climate With Researched-Based Instructional Strategies

Appropriate for: Middle and High School

Great teachers understand that the key to implementing classroom management techniques is how explicitly the practices are executed by the teacher and internalized by the students. This workshop will provide proven ideas and strategies that promote an environment where consistency of management practices transfers into high-yielding benefits for both students and teachers. Educators will receive valuable materials filled with lessons, techniques, and strategies to build relationships with students and to enhance classroom routines to successfully sustain a positive learning environment to improve students’ academic achievement. The strategies presented are based on research regarding successful inclusive school communities, which can lead to 70% fewer classroom discipline problems using effective and positive behavioral techniques. The instructional practices highlighted in this session have been successfully applied within both rural and urban settings and have been utilized to improve social-emotional learning.

Presented by Savanna Flakes, educational consultant on learning disabilities and inclusion, Annandale, Va.

Integration of Mindsets, Essential Skills, and Habits Into K-12 Practice and Policy

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

This workshop, applicable to a variety of grade levels, teaching styles, and SEL competencies, focuses on how to integrate SEL into existing classroom practices using data and the expertise of teachers and administrators. This process encourages educators to closely examine their everyday practices (e.g., lesson planning, teacher evaluations, scheduling) through a new lens in which SEL is emphasized. A variety of research-based strategies exist to apply to the classroom and to school or district-wide policies. However, this session will go beyond the use of such policies, and will provide training to facilitate a more subtle, intricate integration into every day interactions and practices. Additionally, the use of “learning cycles” will be explored, whereby practitioners examine data to monitor whether their changes in practice are resulting in the outcomes they seek. This workshop is an abbreviated version of the Explore More session by the same name offered on Wednesday, May 9, 2018.

Presented by Richard Fournier, director of district partnerships, Transforming Education, Boston, Mass.; and Stephanie Hurley, manager of district partnerships, Transforming Education, Boston, Mass.

Ritualizing Social-Emotional Learning Through Creative Expression

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

In this experiential and interactive session that draws on theories from positive psychology and expressive arts therapy, participants will explore the power of creativity in cultivating mindfulness, emotional well-being and empathy. Participants will discuss the importance of ritualizing a daily practice of identifying and expressing emotions, building a common language around mental health and implementing school wide adoption of social-emotional learning techniques. By engaging in a series of exercises, participants will also explore the use of movement to identify and manage emotions and speak to the kinesthetic dimension of empathy – a crucial component in the perception and expression of emotions. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to discuss ways in which technology can be leveraged to increase accessibility to SEL curriculum without increasing teachers’ workloads. This workshop will be repeated on Thursday, May 10 at 12:45 PM.

Presented by Caitlin Daly, education consultant, Move This World, New York, N.Y.

Six Seconds Framework: Guiding the Development of Social and Emotional Skills in Schools

Appropriate for: Elementary, Middle and High School

A school wide commitment to social emotional learning (SEL) leads students to re-engage, to find a place in school where they can feel safe in their relationships, ready to learn and motivated to succeed. In this workshop, participants will explore and experience the Six Seconds framework for SEL implementation in schools. Participants will engage in activities to develop their emotional literacy, optimism, and intrinsic motivation, among others, and will learn strategies to develop these same competencies in their students. Participants will learn how emotional intelligence (EQ) data can inform teaching practices and identify strategies to infuse social and emotional skills in academic learning and school culture.

Presented by Lorea Martinez, SEL consultant, Six Seconds, San Carlos, Calif.; and Susan Stillman, director of education, Six Seconds, Tucson, Ariz.

Social Emotional Leadership: Self Awareness At the Core of Implementation Strategies

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

This workshop will focus on the social emotional skill building of school-based and other education administrators and its importance on the social emotional growth of staff and students. Participants will explore each of the five CASEL competencies as they relate to leadership. There will be discussion on the necessity for self-awareness when directing, advising, or guiding staff and the impact of skilled self-management especially during stressful situations. Effective leaders must be in tune with the experiences and perspectives of staff, parents and students. This can be a challenge based on the topic at hand. This workshop will explore those challenges and helpful strategies for managing those situations. Finally, as the education leader, an example must be set in terms of responsible and fair decision making. The level of accountability for leaders is quite high but as participants will discuss in this workshop, social emotional leadership is the key to leading social emotional learning.

Presented by Jaye Murray, executive director, Office of Counseling Support Programs, New York City Department of Education, New York, N.Y.

Supporting Early Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset

Appropriate for: Early Childhood and Elementary School

As children face daily challenges and work through mistakes, their responses and reactions to these learning opportunities and social interactions impact their thinking and development within a larger dynamic. Research has shown that a fixed mindset “holds on to the belief that a person’s intelligence, character, and creativity are all static givens that they can’t change.” Alternately, a growth mindset “seeks challenge and believes that failure is not proof of unintelligence but an encouraging springboard for growth and development” (Dweck, 2006). Educators have the opportunity to develop and build a growth mindset in their students, which can ultimately impact academic achievement and even life success. This workshop will explore strategies such as positive, specific feedback, effective coaching and ways to encourage productive struggle through challenges and mistakes. This workshop will be repeated on Thursday, May 10 at 12:45 PM.

Presented by Emily Stewart, early childhood lead and education consultant, California Preschool Instructional Network, Carlsbad, Calif.

Ask the Expert

During this informal session, attendees will have the unique opportunity to talk to internationally-renowned SEL expert, Dr. Maurice Elias. Attendees who select this session can ask specific project-based or school-based questions, get Dr. Elias’s recommendations on a particular challenge, or learn about implementation strategies and best practices. Attendees may also learn from questions posed by others and the broader group discussion. Consultation can be a costly venture so be sure to take advantage of this opportunity while space remains. Only 20 seats available.

Dr. Maurice J. Elias is a professor, Psychology Department, Rutgers University, director of the Rutgers Social-Emotional and Character Development Lab, and academic director of the Collaborative Center for Community-Based Research and Service at Rutgers University.

Bridging Theory to Practice: Advancing a New Vision for Success in Schools

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

There is a broad agreement among educators, policymakers and the public, based on two decades of brain science and education research, that educational systems should graduate students who are proficient in core academic disciplines, able to work cooperatively and communicate with others from diverse backgrounds, practice responsible decision making and behave respectfully and responsibly in a complex world. If academic standards are WHAT students must learn, certain social-emotional skills support HOW they learn. Therefore, SEL skills need to be intentionally and thoughtfully developed over time, explicitly and implicitly, with the same attention and rigor as academic skills. This interactive and thought provoking workshop will provide participants with the resources and tools they need to shift from awareness to action! Participants will gather multiple perspectives, ideas and recommendations to develop a multi-step plan and/or design a framework to illuminate the interdependence between academic and social-emotional outcomes that make the most sense in the context of their organization.

Presented by Ellen Connors, social-emotional learning program manager, The Urban Assembly, New York, N.Y.

Effective Implementation of Social Emotional Learning and Creating an SEL Lab

Appropriate for: Elementary and Middle School

This workshop is intended to enhance participants’ skills in the implementation of the five CASEL SEL competencies in the classroom and beyond. The presenters will introduce how to create a Social Emotional Learning Lab which works in tandem with any SEL or character development program and provides students with concrete skills to help them think rationally in emotionally charged, stressful situations. This workshop will go through, step-by-step how to teach the skills of emotional regulation, effective communication and problem solving. Participants will also learn how to set up an effective Social Emotional Learning Lab and how a lab will assist those students having difficulty internalizing skills taught through preventative programming. Participants will learn concrete strategies to implement a universal SEL program and ideas on how to incorporate these strategies to improve the culture and climate of the school.

Presented by Erin Bruno, coordinator of social decision making, Rutgers University, Piscataway, N.J.; and Victoria Poedubicky, co-developer and trainer for SEL Lab, Rutgers University, Piscataway, N.J.

How Social Emotional Learning Supports Students with Special Needs
Appropriate for: Elementary and Middle School

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) refers to a student’s ability to express emotions appropriately, show empathy for others, build positive relationships and generally make good decisions. While SEL is a universal intervention supporting all students, it can be easily adopted to serve students with special needs. Educators know well that many students with disabilities struggle socially and emotionally in the classroom; they may have difficulty expressing their emotions in healthy ways or connecting with their peers. In this session, participants will explore how classroom structures and practices may impact students’ experiences in school, and learn tools and strategies to support the social and emotional development of students with special needs.

Presented by Lorea Martinez, SEL consultant, Six Seconds, San Carlos, Calif.; and Susan Stillman, director of education, Six Seconds, Tucson, Ariz.

The Mindful Leader: Responding to External Complexities Through Inner Clarity

Appropriate for: Elementary, Middle and High School

Education is a complex and demanding profession requiring personal, internal clarity to ensure excellent job performance. Evidence-based mindfulness practices are strategies to develop and improve this clarity. Developing personal skills and assets, removing impediments, and practicing regularly improves performance and enhances one’s well-being. This session outlines this journey from the perspective of school leaders. Participants will explore the benefits of mindfulness through research, engage in a series of mindful practices to achieve a deeper sense of inner clarity, and leave with additional resources for further exploration and practice.

Presented by Ron Davis, assistant superintendent of secondary education, Mt. Lebanon School District, Pittsburgh, Pa.; and Timothy Steinhauer, superintendent, Mt. Lebanon School District, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Navigating an Education System in a Polarized Social Climate

Appropriate for: Elementary, Middle and High School

The education system can be difficult for diverse families to navigate. Between the over use of acronyms, seemingly unnecessary bureaucratic red tape, and now a growing climate of fear and hate speak it is important that families and educators are armed with the skills to support healthy learning environments for our most vulnerable students. This interactive session is designed to frame some of the many challenges that families and educators face in this current education climate including implicit bias as well as linguistic, ethnic, and cultural diversity. The session will provide tools for supporting the social emotional and civic engagement of families as they navigate through the difficult waters of education. This session is intended to build the participants’ capacity to better serve linguistically and ethnically diverse families.

Presented by Kori Hamilton Biagas, education consultant, Until the Wheels Fall Off, LLC, Cheverly, Md.

Reasoning With Ethics Using Current Events

Appropriate for: Middle and High School

Ethical reasoning and integrating ethics lessons into the school curricula are both explicitly recognized as strategies that are aligned with Character.org’s 11 Principles of Effective Character Education. Both strategies are also recognized to be challenging tasks for teachers. Using core ethical values to support analytical and specifically, ethical reasoning, appears to be a rare achievement as noted by National School of Character site evaluators. Participants will learn how to use core ethical values in the analysis of current events and discuss how to translate the strategy to content in history, literature, health or science. Core ethical values will be identified and applied to the analysis of a current event in the news. Participants will discuss the case and seek a written summary of consensus or divergent points.

Presented David Wangaard, president and director, The School for Ethical Education, Milford, Conn.

Regulating the Brain to Allow SEL Practices to Thrive: A Trauma-Informed Approach

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to how the brain develops, and how trauma and neglect at early ages can cause significant learning and behavior difficulties. We will specifically discuss how these experiences can go on to impact a student’s social and emotional skills. More important than knowing the problem however, is knowing the solution. The brain does have the amazing ability to adapt throughout life. We will discuss many practical interventions that can be implemented to regulate the brain, promoting positive brain growth and ultimately improve academic performance and social interactions. Participants will have an opportunity to practice many of these interventions throughout the session. This session will be repeated Thursday, May 10 at 2:45 PM.

Presented by Josh MacNeill, director of NeuroLogic Initiative, Lakeside Educational Network, North Wales, Pa.; and Kathy Van Horn, executive vice president, Lakeside Educational Network, North Wales, Pa.

Ritualizing Social-Emotional Learning Through Creative Expression

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

In this experiential and interactive session that draws on theories from positive psychology and expressive arts therapy, participants will explore the power of creativity in cultivating mindfulness, emotional well-being and empathy. Participants will discuss the importance of ritualizing a daily practice of identifying and expressing emotions, building a common language around mental health and implementing school wide adoption of social-emotional learning techniques. By engaging in a series of exercises, participants will also explore the use of movement to identify and manage emotions and speak to the kinesthetic dimension of empathy – a crucial component in the perception and expression of emotions. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to discuss ways in which technology can be leveraged to increase accessibility to SEL curriculum without increasing teachers’ workloads. This workshop is a repeat from the Thursday, May 10, 10:15 AM session.

Presented by Caitlin Daly, education consultant, Move This World, New York, N.Y.

Supporting Early Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset

Appropriate for: Early Childhood and Elementary School

As children face daily challenges and work through mistakes, their responses and reactions to these learning opportunities and social interactions impact their thinking and development within a larger dynamic. Research has shown that a fixed mindset “holds on to the belief that a person’s intelligence, character, and creativity are all static givens that they can’t change.” Alternately, a growth mindset “seeks challenge and believes that failure is not proof of unintelligence but an encouraging springboard for growth and development” (Dweck, 2006). Educators have the opportunity to develop and build a growth mindset in their students, which can ultimately impact academic achievement and even life success. This workshop will explore strategies such as positive, specific feedback, effective coaching and ways to encourage productive struggle through challenges and mistakes. This workshop is a repeat from the Thursday, May 10, 10:15 AM session.

Presented by Emily Stewart, early childhood lead and education consultant, California Preschool Instructional Network, Carlsbad, Calif.

Supporting SEL Through Morning Meetings

Appropriate for: Early Childhood and Elementary School

Morning Meeting allows students and teachers to begin each day as a community of caring and respectful learners. Woven throughout each Morning Meeting is the purposeful modeling and practicing of the social and emotional (SEL) competencies that are important for success in school and life. What SEL competencies will your students need in math later today? Or at recess? Using small- and large-group discussions, videos, and interactive learning structures, participants will learn how to format their Morning Meeting to best serve the SEL needs of their students.

Presented by Kerry O’Grady, consulting teacher, Responsive Classroom, Turner Falls, Mass.

Ask the Expert

During this informal session, attendees will have the unique opportunity to talk to SEL Specialist, Judy Nuss, who currently consults for the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL). Attendees who select this session can ask specific project-based or school-based questions, get Judy’s recommendations on a particular challenge, or learn about implementation strategies and best practices. Attendees may also learn from questions posed by others and the broader group discussion. Consultation can be a costly venture so be sure to take advantage of this opportunity while space remains. Only 20 seats available.

Judy Nuss is a long-time educator, classroom teacher, principal, central office staff, SEL director and SEL special consultant. She has supported district-wide implementation of SEL in Sacramento, Austin, Tampa and El Paso. Much of her work involves providing SEL professional learning for educators.

Building Resilience Through Physical Play

Appropriate for: Early Childhood

Risk and injury are scary, but physical play is an essential part of child development. If we look at physical play as an opportunity to build resilience, we can help children develop life skills like self-regulation and self-care. This workshop encourages early childhood educators to reframe the idea of health and safety in terms of building children’s resilience, rather than in terms of avoiding risk. Participants will discuss the crucial developmental benefits children gain from the experience of taking risks, and will consider health and safety policies in the light of what we know about the importance of risk-taking in childhood. Participants will also deepen their understanding of children’s health, explore strategies to build resilience in children, and discuss how those strategies connect to children’s physical, cognitive and socio-emotional growth.

Presented by Jarrod Green, co-director, Children’s Community School, Philadelphia, Pa.

Classroom and School Strategies to Support Integrity

Appropriate for: Middle and High School

It was Socrates who was noted to say that virtue cannot be taught, yet paradoxically he spent the balance of his life trying to do so anyway. Twenty-five hundred years later, we still wrestle with this question but have generally come to the consensus that children can learn attitudes, skills and habits that demonstrate positive character. Integrity is one character trait that can become challenged, particularly as our students move from middle to high school. Research has consistently shown a dramatic increase in academic dishonesty from middle school into the junior year of high school. So, what does it take to be a person of integrity and how can teachers support a culture of integrity while students feel the pressure for academic performance? Join us as we highlight strategies to advance student integrity in secondary schools with a focus on encouraging a commitment to academic integrity. Guided participant discussion will identify best practices and a model secondary-school implementation program will be described with resources and activities to encourage the school culture in support of integrity.

Presented by David Wangaard, president and director, The School for Ethical Education, Milford, Conn.

Connecting the Dots: Developing Social, Emotional, and Employability Skills in Out-of-School Settings

Appropriate for: Elementary, Middle and High School

We all know that young people need a wide array of important skills in order to be ready for school, work, and life. In fact, regardless of the career path someone chooses, the ability to communicate, manage challenging situations, maintain healthy relationships and regulate emotions and behavior are fundamental for success. Out-of-school programs around the country are working to help develop critical social, emotional, and workforce readiness skills in youth every day. In this session, participants will learn more about how afterschool programs can support employability through social and emotional and character development and will leave with some practical tools and strategies to implement that will benefit all students.

Presented by Dan Gilbert, project manager, Afterschool Alliance, Washington, D.C.; Jessy Newman, researcher, American Institutes for Research, Chicago, Ill.; and Heather Pressley, senior vice president of mission advancement, Girls on the Run International, Charlotte, N.C.

Parents and Professionals Together: Promoting Social Emotional Development

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

Parents are their children’s first and most influential teachers. Parents and professionals (health, education and human services) work together to create optimal learning environments for children. A key element in this work is understanding child development: cognitive, physical and social-emotional. This workshop will explore ways that professionals can convey information and communicate strategies and activities with parents that support healthy social and emotional development of their children. It will emphasize a strengths-based approach that honors parents’ knowledge and experience and will discuss inclusion of parents in organizational programs that focus on children’s social and emotional competence.

Presented by Karen Shanoski, partnerships project manager, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, Pa.

Regulating the Brain to Allow SEL Practices to Thrive: A Trauma-Informed Approach

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to how the brain develops, and how trauma and neglect at early ages can cause significant learning and behavior difficulties. We will specifically discuss how these experiences can go on to impact a student’s social and emotional skills. More important than knowing the problem however, is knowing the solution. The brain does have the amazing ability to adapt throughout life. We will discuss many practical interventions that can be implemented to regulate the brain, promoting positive brain growth and ultimately improve academic performance and social interactions. Participants will have an opportunity to practice many of these interventions throughout the session. This workshop is a repeat from the Thursday, May 10, 12:45 PM session.

Presented by Josh MacNeill, director of NeuroLogic Initiative, Lakeside Educational Network, North Wales, Pa.; and Kathy Van Horn, executive vice president, Lakeside Educational Network, North Wales, Pa.

A Resilience Continuum: Assessing and Supporting the Social and Emotional Skills of Children and Teachers

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary and Middle School

In recent years, increasing attention has been placed on the importance of within-child protective factors related to resilience (e.g., social and emotional skills) in children of all ages. These protective factors include competencies (such as self-control or relationship skills) that help children cope with life’s challenges and are associated with increases in school readiness and academic achievement, improvements in attitudes and interactions, and decreases in behavioral concerns. This workshop will outline the benefits of promoting social and emotional skills in infancy through middle school, and will identify and describe specific skills which can be observed and taught across age groups. Research demonstrating the importance of promoting these skills early and consistently, and research-based strategies to promote these skills in various settings, will be presented. Participants will learn how teachers can use social emotional assessments to gain insight into children’s strengths and needs, and will learn the benefits of using this information to guide instruction.

Presented by Alyssa Ciarlante, research associate, The Devereux Center for Resilient Children, Villanova, Pa.; and Jennifer Robitaille, senior research associate, Aperture Education, King of Prussia, Pa.

Social and Emotional Aspects of Reading and Literacy

Appropriate for: Early Childhood and Elementary School

Reading is often considered to be a cognitive activity but the social and emotional aspects cannot be ignored if we are to develop lifelong learners. Books reflect the social and emotional content of life and any good reading program must acknowledge this. This workshop will review the stages of the reading comprehension process and the neural processes based on 40 years of psychological research. We will begin a conversation on the education of the “whole child” by discussing the role of personal experience (background knowledge) on reading comprehension. When children take ownership of their learning, they can accomplish exponentially more – but this can only be achieved when we recognize their social and emotional needs. This is especially true when we realize how vulnerable children are when they read. Leave this session with an understanding of children’s neural activity but also the social and emotional development of children as it applies to reading comprehension from a psychological perspective.

Presented by Claire Rubman, professor, Suffolk County Community College, Selden, N.Y.

Social and Emotional Teaching: Earning Teacher Buy-In

Appropriate for: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle and High School

As research mounts to support SEL, a growing number of districts and schools are implementing related programming. However, for this programming to be effective, teachers must believe in its value and be able and willing to implement it with fidelity. Requiring that a teacher facilitate SEL lessons is not enough; students know when teachers are not invested in content. This workshop will present research on how teachers’ perspectives impact instruction and will explore ways to measure teacher buy-in (e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, and fidelity checks) with examples of each. Participants will also explore the core competencies of SEL through the lens of the teacher, pinpointing tips and tools for helping teachers develop their own self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making before they are to model these competencies for their students. Additionally, participants will explore best practices around coaching teachers on SEL, including strategies as well as the research and theory behind them.

Presented by Shea Quraishi, social and emotional learning director, Frameworks of Tampa Bay, Tampa, Fla.

Using Experiential Learning to Support Social and Emotional Learning

Appropriate for: Middle and High School

Social and emotional skills are learned through careful combinations of guidance, interaction, and productive reflection. The tool of experiential learning can be powerfully supportive if its specific steps and methods are consciously used. Today, the benefits of interactive learning methods are generally accepted, yet only a limited number of practitioners actually understand the specific structure of a well-designed experiential learning activity and how to guide students through its four stages. In this workshop, participants will explore the art and theory of experiential learning, learn why it is effective, gain concrete applications for teaching, counseling, and disciplinary situations, and leave with a menu of adaptable activities to use with students. Activities will include personal reflection, small group discussions, and on-your-feet activities.

Presented by Shanti Thompson, vice president of training, Legacy International, Bedford, Va.